New EU rule - cars with breathalyser interface and speed limiters by 2022
These measures are for new cars and it appears it cannot possibly be the intention that existing cars on the roads today should have these technologies retro-fitted as that would be impossibly difficult and expensive. So on that basis there are no concerns for the classic car owners. Possibly older cars will become more popular simply because they do not have the breathalysers and speed limiters fitted with the consequent associated restraints they would impose.

UK drink-drive limits
There are strict alcohol limits for drivers, but it’s impossible to say exactly how many drinks they equal - it’s different for each person.
The limits in Scotland are different to those in the rest of the UK.

The way alcohol affects you depends on:
> your weight, age, sex and metabolism (the rate your body uses energy).
> the type and amount of alcohol.
> what you’ve eaten recently.
> your stress levels at the time.

Update
A longstanding V8 Register member, Maurits Clement, in the Netherlands has been in touch saying reporting "a new EU regulation says that all new cars must have integrated breathalyser and speed-limiters by 2022" sounded a bit extreme for me. The regulation is that any new vehicle should have an interface so the car is ready for the installation of an alcohol interlock. Such an installation is often ordered by a judge in the case of a conviction for driving under influence. The required interface makes such an installation a 'plug and play' exercise.
So it turns out this measure is less drastic than now described on the website". Our NEWS item has been amended to reflect that clarification.

Updated: 191127
Posted: 191126



Alcohol interlock device or "alcolock". More


Single Use Breathalyser from Halfords. More

Information note on the new EU regulation
See our note with extracts from the EU documents, definitions and other related material. More
New cars to have a breathalyser interface and speed limiter by 2022 following the arrival of a new EU rule
Reports of a new EU regulation say all new cars must have an interface installed which enables the fitment of aftermarket alcohol interlock devices (integrated breathalysers) and speed-limiters by 2022 but also existing models sold after 2024 must also have this updated safety technology.

The landmark ruling by the European Council received provisional approval in March 2019 but has only just been rubber-stamped by European officials last week. The British Government has confirmed the standards will apply in the United Kingdom, despite Brexit. The European Transport Safety Council (ETSC) say it may cut traffic collisions by 30% and save 25,000 lives across Europe over the next 15 years.

What are alcohol interlock devices in vehicles?
Typically the systems consist of two parts: an alcohol breathalyser unit into which the driver provides a breath sample and an immobiliser that will prevent the vehicle from starting if the breath sample provided is above the set alcohol limit.

The regulation Such an installation is often ordered by a judge in case of conviction for driving under influence. The required interface makes such an installation a 'plug and play' exercise.

In-car breathalysers are common in Australia and the United States, where they’re known more often as ‘alcohol interlock devices’, or ‘alcolocks’. Fitted onto the dashboard, the breathalyser needs a clean breath sample before the car’s engine will start. If the driver doesn’t pass the test, they must wait a certain amount of time before they can re-test.

What are speed limiters?
‘Intelligent Speed Assistance’ (ISA) software stops drivers from going above speed limits and can slow speeding vehicles. Other features can detect when a driver is falling asleep, drifting over lanes or losing concentration. The speed-limiter software uses GPS data and speed limits from local traffic cameras, displaying the limits on your car’s dashboard.

Testing for drug use
Will we soon see an in-car systems to test for drugs and monitor mobile phone use?

Will classic cars be swept into retrofitting these devices?
Our reading of these regulations is we do not think that it can possibly be the intention that existing cars should have these technologies retrofitted, that would be impossibly difficult and expensive. There has in fact only ever been one instance of compulsory retrofitting in the UK, which was the very simple matter of fitting reflectors.

What it must mean is that from 2022 all new models introduced must have these technologies built in, but existing models can continue to be manufactured and sold without them until 2024, after which all new cars must have them. So on that basis there are no concerns for the classic car movement at present – except possibly older cars will become more popular simply because they would not have to have a breathalyser interface and speed limiter fitted with the associated EU restraints they would impose.