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Rear parking sensor for a rubber bumper V8 using radar
Finding a way to fit rear parking sensors on his rubber bumper MGBGTV8 was something John Gay wanted to do, so he set about researching the options and the practical ways of undertaking an installation. As an early step he posted a query on the V8 Bulletin Board seeking fellow members' views. Here he explains what he found and the trial fittings he has undertaken.

Which technology was chosen for the parking sensors?
John was grateful for Paul Atkinson highlighting these devices that "emit radar signals from a straight radio aerial positioned parallel to the ground as opposed to ultrasonic sound signals from circular transmitters/receivers seen on many rear bumpers".

EPS parking sensors produced exclusively by Proxel
John Gay purchased his electromagnetic parking sensors direct from Proxel in Torino in Italy https://www.proxel.com/en/ . They are based on an innovative concept that uses electromagnetic waves with low energy. When reversing the small control unit generates an electromagnetic field and transfers this to the transceiver adhesive strip that is placed on the inner side of the removing the rear bumper and then insulating the armature from the chassis by using nylon top-hat insulating washers and nylon flat washers around the fixing studs. Then the aerial was bolted to the armature at one end making the armature itself the aerial.

Fortunately, the rear fog lights do not need earthing via the armature.


Removing the rear bumper and then insulating the armature from the chassis by using nylon top-hat insulating washers and nylon flat washers around the fixing studs.

John explained that "unfortunately this mock-up made the reversing sensor sound when a sharp slope up was encountered when reversing out into the road. This is because the armature is at a rather low level for optimum operation of the system". John adds "I am still assessing this but I have inserted a push-button switch (single pole double throw momentary) into the supply to the sensor. That is, the supply is only interrupted when I push the button. Not unlike a bell push. This push button has been located under the voltmeter in the dashboard and allows me to reboot the system from the driver's seat experimentally".

John says "the operation of the system is as good as we are going to get. It has the benefit of not being visible".

He adds "I had originally hoped to fix a wire aerial to the inside of the rear rubber bumper skin when the rear bumper skin was removed. This had to be abandoned because the "rubber" making the rear bumper skin was found to be stuck to the armature too firmly and would

The buzzer location was half way up the pillar on the rear edge of the driver's door.



probably mean destroying the 40-year-old rear bumper skin while trying to do so. The rear bumper skin is also reinforced with "rubber" fins on the inside face of the bumper and honeycombs making insertion of a wire very difficult".

The power supply for the sensor is provided by a connection to the reversing lamp supply. To provide an audible alert for the driver when reversing near an obstacle, a buzzer is positioned inside the car. The buzzer location was half way up the pillar on the rear edge of the driver's door.
John Gay notes that "with this installation, I can only comment on its use on my rubber bumpered MGBGTV8. I do not think it is possible to insert a wire beneath the rubber skin. However, my comments on the installation could well apply to a chrome bumpered V8 with the chrome bumper itself taking the place of my armature".

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